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Dr William Kemp - Quantum Vision System + Upsells

Manufacturer: Jay
The “truth” about “Quantum Vision System” is not pretty. It’s the name of given to a slick e-mail based advertisement floating around the Net supposedly Format File: PDF, MP4 File size: 219.07 MB
SKU: DWKQVSU
$37.00
$15.00
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Dr William Kemp - Quantum Vision System + Upsells

Dr William Kemp - Quantum Vision System + Upsells

 

The “truth” about “Quantum Vision System” is not pretty.  It’s the name of given to a slick e-mail based advertisement floating around the Net supposedly authored by a Dr. Kemp. The emails send you to an even slicker web site asking for the “low price” of $37 (or $27 if you reject the first offer)  for what appears to be three booklets about eye exercises “guaranteed” to improve your eyesight.  If it looks familiar, it probably is — it is almost identical to the questionable Restore My Vision Today offering also hawked on the Internet — and it was probably conjured up by the same marketers that have created “Quantum”.   There, you are treated to a videomercial that touts the “proven way to perfect your vision”.   Is it a scam?   Is it a rip-off?  Does it work?    You’ll never find out, largely because of an increasingly pernicious Internet industry that offers fake product review sites.    You’ll also never be able to find out about the credentials of the Dr. Kemp — none apparently exist on the Internet, nor are they provided at his own alleged web site.    So, should you spend the $37?   We recommend not, for the following reasons:

Get immediately download Dr William Kemp - Quantum Vision System + Upsells
1.  There’s a reason this sales pitch is slick — they spend a lot of marketing money to get it to you.   Who is paying for that?  You are.   And, like many scammers, they are using Clickbank to sell their ebook so don’t assume you’ll get a refund.

2.  If you look for a review of the product, you are deluged with lots of fake review or “scam” sites that simply direct you to the main sales site or offer some officious pablum talking about how the product is highly rated or recommended.   (such as scamX.com and infoscamreviews.com)   The marketers for this service paid to have these fake sites thwart any customer looking for real reviews.   It is also a tactic to obscure any customers who have posted complaints or alerts about fraudulent claims.

Dr William Kemp - Quantum Vision System + Upsells

Dr William Kemp - Quantum Vision System + Upsells

 

The “truth” about “Quantum Vision System” is not pretty.  It’s the name of given to a slick e-mail based advertisement floating around the Net supposedly authored by a Dr. Kemp. The emails send you to an even slicker web site asking for the “low price” of $37 (or $27 if you reject the first offer)  for what appears to be three booklets about eye exercises “guaranteed” to improve your eyesight.  If it looks familiar, it probably is — it is almost identical to the questionable Restore My Vision Today offering also hawked on the Internet — and it was probably conjured up by the same marketers that have created “Quantum”.   There, you are treated to a videomercial that touts the “proven way to perfect your vision”.   Is it a scam?   Is it a rip-off?  Does it work?    You’ll never find out, largely because of an increasingly pernicious Internet industry that offers fake product review sites.    You’ll also never be able to find out about the credentials of the Dr. Kemp — none apparently exist on the Internet, nor are they provided at his own alleged web site.    So, should you spend the $37?   We recommend not, for the following reasons:

Get immediately download Dr William Kemp - Quantum Vision System + Upsells
1.  There’s a reason this sales pitch is slick — they spend a lot of marketing money to get it to you.   Who is paying for that?  You are.   And, like many scammers, they are using Clickbank to sell their ebook so don’t assume you’ll get a refund.

2.  If you look for a review of the product, you are deluged with lots of fake review or “scam” sites that simply direct you to the main sales site or offer some officious pablum talking about how the product is highly rated or recommended.   (such as scamX.com and infoscamreviews.com)   The marketers for this service paid to have these fake sites thwart any customer looking for real reviews.   It is also a tactic to obscure any customers who have posted complaints or alerts about fraudulent claims.